Weekly Forum: #49

Although mischaracterized as unobservant, Dr Watson was an intelligent man who learned from Sherlock Holmes’ methods throughout the many years they worked together. In fact, there is an example of this in DEVI, where Dr Watson applies those methods of observation to keep pace his friend’s deductions:

“Mr. Holmes,” said the vicar in an agitated voice, “the most extraordinary and tragic affair has occurred during the night. It is the most unheard-of business. We can only regard it as a special Providence that you should chance to be here at the time, for in all England you are the one man we need.”

I glared at the intrusive vicar with no very friendly eyes; but Holmes took his pipe from his lips and sat up in his chair like an old hound who hears the view-halloa. He waved his hand to the sofa, and our palpitating visitor with his agitated companion sat side by side upon it. Mr. Mortimer Tregennis was more self-contained than the clergyman, but the twitching of his thin hands and the brightness of his dark eyes showed that they shared a common emotion.

“Shall I speak or you?” he asked of the vicar.

“Well, as you seem to have made the discovery, whatever it may be, and the vicar to have had it second-hand, perhaps you had better do the speaking,” said Holmes.

I glanced at the hastily clad clergyman, with the formally dressed lodger seated beside him, and was amused at the surprise which Holmes’s simple deduction had brought to their faces.

Can you find other moments in the Canon where Dr Watson uses Holmes’ methods of observation?

Interview Series: Imagination Theater Part 4

Jim French Productions Presents Imagination Theater produces hundreds of contemporary radio dramas and mysteries, such as “The Classic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.” John Patrick Lowrie plays Sherlock Holmes and Larry Albert (JHWS “Bertie”) plays Dr John Watson in the popular radio series.

This part of the interview is the conclusion of our discussion. Please read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 if you haven’t yet.

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Fall 2015 Publications

Fall BooksI am very happy and relieved to announce that your Fall volumes of The Watsonian and The Fiction Series are traveling to your mailbox as we speak.

I sincerely apologize for the delay. I will speak with our printer/distributor to find how best to move the books out faster. If you do not receive your copy of the above volumes in two weeks, then please contact me so that I may help sort out the matter for you.

I hope you will enjoy them!

Interview Series: Imagination Theater Part 3

Jim French Productions Presents Imagination Theater produces hundreds of contemporary radio dramas and mysteries, such as “The Classic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.” John Patrick Lowrie plays Sherlock Holmes and Larry Albert (JHWS “Bertie”) plays Dr John Watson in the popular radio series.

This interview is a continuation of our discussion in Part 1 and Part 2.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

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Weekly Forum #47

There’s a “new” book out titled Sherlock: The Essential Arthur Conan Doyle Adventures which collects 19 famous cases that the BBC Sherlock creators, Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, view as essential reading.

If you’re like me, you’re not particularly interested in this book because you already own at least half a dozen different versions of the complete Sherlock Holmes canon (How did I end up with so many versions? How much is too much?). However, I did find their listing of 19 “essential” stories interesting. Here is the list of stories that they selected for the book:

A Study In Scarlet
The Sign of Four
A Scandal in Bohemia
The Red-Headed League
A Case of Identity
The Man with the Twisted Lip
The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle
The Adventure of the Speckled Band
Silver Blaze
The Yellow Face
The Musgrave Ritual
The Greek Interpreter
The Final Problem
The Hound of the Baskervilles
The Empty House
Charles Augustus Milverton
The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans
The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot
The Adventure of the Dying Detective

(This reminds me of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s selection of 19 stories.)

So! If you were going to put together a collection of “essentials” or if you were about to offer a selection for a friend to read the Canon for the first time, would you agree with the above list?

If you don’t agree with the list, what ones would you replace and what have they overlooked?

In Memory of Tom Leahy, JHWS “Travis”

We announce with great sadness the passing Tom Leahy, JHWS “Travis” in September of this year. He was not only one of our own, but he was also an active and popular member of scion societies in the New Jersey area and was noted for his vast and wide-ranging knowledge of all sorts of subjects, including Sherlock Holmes. An excellent artist, he drew full color illustrations of stories from the Canon. As JHWS “Willow” added when he informed us of his passing, “He was also friendly, funny, and enthusiastic… Everyone liked and respected Tom.”

What follows is the obituary of Tom Leahy, as prepared by his brother Pat and sent to us. Our deepest sympathies to Pat and all of Tom’s family for their loss. We wish to stand upon the terrace one last time and reflect on the passing of a good man, a skilled artist, and a fellow Watsonian who will be greatly missed…

Thomas Francis Leahy

January 29, 1952- September 6, 2015

Born: Margaret Hague Hospital, Jersey City, NJ

Oldest son of Thomas & Nora Leahy, Brothers, Patrick, Timothy & Sister, Nora

Tom attended Epiphany School of Cliffside Park & Central Boulevard School of Palisades Park.

Graduated from Bergen Tech High School, Hackensack, NJ and after joined the Navy. Was honorably discharged due to Medical Reasons.

Worked in the United States Postal Service for 34 years and retired in 2006. Tom resided in Teaneck, NJ with his mother, who just recently passed away on March 9, 2015.

Tom had many interest and talents. He was a brilliant guitar player as well as the piano. All self-taught. A masterful artist, avid photographer and an expert on movies and film and a wiz at Jeopardy.

He was a collector of all kinds of memorabilia.

He was buried in his favorite Beatie shirt with a pin on the pillow that said the game is afoot.

Tom belonged to numerous clubs and organizations.

No one took better care of his Mom then he did. Now they are together again. He will be greatly missed.

Interview Series: Imagination Theater Part 2

Jim French Productions Presents Imagination Theater produces hundreds of contemporary radio dramas and mysteries, such as “The Classic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.” John Patrick Lowrie plays Sherlock Holmes and Larry Albert (JHWS “Bertie”) plays Dr John Watson in the popular radio series.

This interview is a continuation of our discussion in Part 1.

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Weekly Forum #46

I have plans to visit the London and Brighton area from January 18th to February 1st next year. I’ve never been to London before and do not know what to expect.

Have you ever been to (or lived in) London? Did you happen to meet any fellow Watsonians or have particularly Sherlockian experiences while you were there? Please share.

Interview Series: Imagination Theater Part 1

Earlier this year, while attending Sherlock Seattle 2015, I had a rare and wonderful opportunity to meet two living legends of Sherlockian radio: John Patrick Lowrie and Larry Albert (JHWS “Bertie”), the voices of Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson for Imagination Theater.

Jim French Productions Presents Imagination Theater produces hundreds of contemporary radio dramas and mysteries, such as the “Harry Nile” noir detective series, “Kerides, the Thinker”, and of course “The Classic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.”

When I met with John Patrick Lowrie (a well-known voice actor who plays Sherlock Holmes in the radio series and is the author of “Dancing with Eternity“) and Larry Albert (who plays Dr John Watson, produces for Jim French Productions, and also stars as Harry Nile in the eponymous radio series), we spoke for an hour about the nature of Holmes and Watson on the radio, the history of radio drama, and a great deal more.

I’ve transcribed our discussion for your to enjoy. But since it is a lengthy one, I will present it in four parts: one part every Thursday for the next four weeks. I hope it entertains you as much as speaking with these two fellows entertained me.

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