What? There’s still a January meeting?

Since last weekend was a very special “Sherlock Holmes Birthday Weekend” gathering of the John H. Watson Society and friends, and since our actual monthly meetings tend to happen without speakers, agendas, or much planning . . . well, why not have a meeting on our normal weekend of the month?

So here’s our last minute meeting details for any of you Watson fans who just want to show up and see what happens:

When: Jan 22, 2022 12:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwsf-2upz8iG9ONAvF0THmQOsSVOqh6sHzI

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Society Membership

We were pleased to see so many folks at our Zoom sessions over the Weekend of Birthday Festivities. Much fun was had!

So much fun, in fact, that our Shopkeeper (that would be me) is a little bit behind in processing the membership orders that came in over the weekend.

A thousand apologies for the delay! Rest assured, your order has been received, and you will see a Welcome email very soon.

John H. Watson Society’s Birthday Party for Sherlock

This Saturday, at a very abnormal time for us, the John H. Watson Society will be joining in on the weekend festivities with a 2:30 PM EST Zoom gathering to celebrate the birthday of John’s best friend (and etc.) Sherlock Holmes. It’s a little hard to play “Pin The Tail On Holmes or Watson” on Zoom, even if they both identified themselves on the animal in question (Watson in “Reigate Squires,” Holmes in “Bruce-Partington Plans.”) but we’ll figure out something appropriate, especially if you help in the comments below.

When: Jan 15, 2022 01:30 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcqduGoqzwrEtfhaa86i5ltHAcskecexI4F

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

WE STROLLED ABOUT TOGETHER

An occasional feature about the places in the John H Watson Canon

It was twilight of a lovely spring evening, and even Little Ryder Street, one of the smaller offshoots from the Edgware Road, within a stone-cast of old Tyburn Tree of evil memory, looked golden and wonderful in the slanting rays of the setting sun. The particular house to which we were directed was a large, old-fashioned, Early Georgian edifice with a flat brick face broken only by two deep bay windows on the ground floor. It was on this ground floor that our client lived, and, indeed, the low windows proved to be the front of the huge room in which he spent his waking hours. Holmes pointed as we passed to the small brass plate which bore the curious name.

              —’The Adventure of the Three Garridebs’

Tyburn was the main place of public execution in London from at least 1388 until 1783, when it was replaced by Newgate. It takes its name from the Tyburn stream, which ran from Hampstead to the Thames near Vauxhall Bridge, and was so well know that the word became, for a time, synonymous with gallows. Tyburn gallows stood close to where Marble Arch is now, and the approximate site is marked by a stone in the traffic island at the junction of Edgware Road and Bayswater Road. An iron plaque is located about fifty yards west of Marble Arch.

From London Lore: The Legends and Traditions of the World’s Most Vibrant City by Steve Roud, Arrow Books, 2010, p. 80

Meeting this Saturday, December 18!

We know, you’ve got all that Christmas shopping to do, family showing up so as not to compete with some other side of the family next weekend, Spiderman: No Way Home matinees, and a thousand other virus-prone things to keep you busy this Saturday, but your good doctor Watson would surely want you to stay inside and come to the John H. Watson Society zoom gathering at the usual time.

Will there be a program? Will bull pup Calder just try to get you to help him plan the Sherlock’s birthday weekend zoom party (and potential Saturday JHWS event)? You just never know with our merry band.

But, all that said, you are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Dec 18, 2021 12:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAvc-2upj0sG90upFLyfo1Kw-U697Afd5XM

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

WORDS ON WATSON

An occasional feature of published pages about John Watson

Speaking of my old friend and biographer, I would take this opportunity to remark that if I burden myself with a companion in my various little inquiries it is not done out of sentiment or caprice, but it is that Watson has some remarkable characteristics of his own, to which in his modesty he has given small attention amid his exaggerated estimates of my own performances. A confederate who foresees your conclusions and course of action is always dangerous, but one to whom each development comes as a perpetual surprise, and to whom the future is always a closed book, is, indeed, an ideal helpmate.

–Sherlock Holmes, ‘The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier’

December meeting a week early!

Rather than waiting to call upon Sherlock Holmes AFTER Christmas, the John H. Watson Society will be avoiding a holiday conflict by moving our meeting up a week to December 18. And here’s the registration link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAvc-2upj0sG90upFLyfo1Kw-U697Afd5XM

Join us for some unexpected Blue Carbuncle fun and all the usual Watsonian chatter, in directions even more unexpected — you don’t even have to be a JHWS member to attend!

A little Watson pub trivia anyone?

Did we ever mention that you don’t have to be a card-carrying member of the John H. Watson Society to attend a meeting of the JHWS? (Hint: We don’t have membership cards.)

Our next meeting is tomorrow (Saturday, November 27th at) at the magical hour of 10 AM PDT, 11 AM MDT, 12 Noon CDT, 1 PM EDT, 6 PM BST, 7 PM CEST, etc. , and in the grand tradition of the best pub trivia we’ll be testing Watson knowledge while we share some as well. Calculate and double-calculate what time that happens in your time zone and join us for some fun.

The registration link is  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0vduihrj0tHdI1bceHd20aq5eKeP8XxO2n

Our November Zoom with trivia fun!

Here we go again! Yes, it may be a holiday weekend in one of the countries we’re based in, but when is a meeting of the John H. Watson Society anything but a holiday? We’re going to have some fun little Watson pub trivia that you can enjoy even if you don’t have his immortal words memorized, along with the usual chatter, so take a break last Saturday of the month for a visit.

When is it happening? Saturday, November 27th at 10 AM PDT, 11 AM MDT, 12 Noon CDT, 1 PM EDT, 6 PM BST, 7 PM CEST, etc. — and be sure to double check that time against your local time zone. Need a reminder? Get a Watson reminder buddy!

If you haven’t got a Watson reminder buddy, if you’d like to get invited to the Zoom, and or if you haven’t gotten the link already from some back-alley source, just email podcast@johnhwatsonsociety.com to get in on the event.

Happy Birthday Andrew Hilton!

Born October 21, 1947, Hilton was a Shakespearian actor who would go on to found Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory. In 1986 he performed as Doctor Watson in two episodes for BBC Radio 4 – The Mystery of the Reluctant Storyteller and The Valley of Fear.

Director, Actor, & Playwright | Bristol | www.andrewhilton.online

WORDS ON WATSON

An occasional feature of published pages about John Watson

Several people have addressed the question of who wrote “His Last Bow”, “The Mazarine Stone” and the second half of A Study in Scarlet because they are written from an unusual third person perspective. For many, the obvious fact is they were written by someone other than Watson, and, therefore, they are not to be trusted. But there is nothing so deceptive as an obvious fact.

These stores were all written by Watson. However, he makes it clear when he is not reporting from personal experience by turning to the third person. It is his way of letting us know that while the facts are accurate to the best of his knowledge, that knowledge is second hand and may be liable to error.

From Watson Does Not Lie, Paul Thomas Miller, Wildside Press, 2019, p. 12

The Bride of Watson, or Watson the Bride?

Time again to summon the Society of Watson to speak of the things of which no one else speaks. And this being October, as the darkness claims the land, and the spirits of the dead come closer to the veil, even matters Watsonian must turn to shadowed tales of . . . well, you’ll just have to come to the October meeting to find out! 

When is it happening? Saturday, October 23rd at 10 AM PDT, 11 AM MDT, 12 Noon CDT, 1 PM EDT, 6 PM BST, 7 PM CEST, etc. — and be sure to double check that time against your local time zone (especially if your name rhymes with “Doll Lomax Killer”).

If you’d like to get invited to the Zoom, and haven’t gotten the link already from some back-alley source, just email podcast@johnhwatsonsociety.com to get in on the event.

Happy Birthday David Buck!

Buck was born on October 17, 1936. He worked primarily in science fiction and fantasy films, including the 1978 Lord of the Rings and 1982’s The Dark Crystal. In 1978 he portrayed Doctor Watson in 13 episodes for BBC Radio 4.

NPG x135406; David Buck - Portrait - National Portrait Gallery

WORDS ON WATSON

An occasional feature of published pages about John Watson

From A Sherlock Holmes Commentary, D. Martin Dakin, Drake Publishers Inc., 1972, p. 306.

WE STROLLED ABOUT TOGETHER

An occasional feature about the places in the John H Watson Canon

My friend had no breakfast himself, for it was one of his peculiarities that in his more intense moments he would permit himself no food, and I have known him presume upon his iron strength until he has fainted from pure inanition. ‘At present I cannot spare energy and nerve force for digestion,’ he would say, in answer to my medical remonstrances. I was not surprised, therefore, when this morning he left his untouched meal behind him and started with me for Norwood.

“The Adventure of the Norwood Builder”

The formerly wild and desolate area of Norwood, named after the extensive North Wood that once covered the area, is where two counties, Surrey and Kent, and five modern London boroughs meet–Croydon, Bromley, Lambeth, Lewisham, and Southwark. Until the mid nineteenth century, when rapid development transformed the area, it contained not only extensive woods but also acres of open wasteland, and had a reputation of danger and mystery. For centuries it was famous for the Gypsies who lived there, and gave rise to numerous rumours and stories among the settled populations of the surrounding areas.

From London Lore: The Legends and Traditions of the World’s Most Vibrant City, Steve Roud, Arrow Books, 2010, p. 405

WORDS ON WATSON

An occasional feature of published pages about John Watson

From The Complete Guide to Sherlock Holmes, Michael Hardwick, St. Martin’s Press, 1986, p.237

WE STROLLED ABOUT TOGETHER

An occasional feature about the places in the John H Watson Canon

It was upon the 3rd of May that we reached the little village of Meiringen, where we put up at the Englischer Hof, then kept by Peter Steiler the elder.  Our landlord was an intelligent man, and spoke excellent English, having served for three years as waiter at the Grosvenor Hotel in London.  At his advice, upon the afternoon of the 4th we set off together with the intention of crossing the hills and spending the night at the hamlet of Rosenlaui.  We had strict injunctions, however, on no account to pass the falls of Reichenbach, which are about half-way up the hill, without making a small detour to see them.
 It is, indeed, a fearful place.

Rosenlaui Bad, a hamlet in the central part of Switzerland, on the right bank of the River Reichenbach. While it is just three miles from Meiringen, it is more than two thousand feet higher in elevation and the walk from Meiringen requires at least three hours via the Reichenbach Falls. Holmes and Watson set off for here from Meiringen.

From The Encyclopaedia Sherlockiana, Jack Tracey, editor, Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1977, p.308.

Rosenlaui itself rates no mention in SWITZERLAND [Karl Baedeker in 1887, in his Switzerland and the Adjacent Portions of Italy, Savoy and the Tyroil hereinafter “SWITZERLAND”]; however, the “Baths of Rosenlaui, located at 4363., is recommended.

From The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edited, with Annotations by Leslie S. Klinger, “The Final Problem”, note 69, p. 266.