3GAR

On June 27th…

(Source: A Day by Day Chronology of Mr. Sherlock Holmes According to Zeisler and Christ, compiled by William S Dorn)

June 27, 1890: Holmes and Watson traveled by train to Boscombe Valley. [BOSC]

Illustration by Sidney Paget for The Strand Magazine (1891)

Sherlock Holmes was pacing up and down the platform, his tall, gaunt figure made even gaunter and taller by his long gray travelling-cloak and close-fitting cloth cap.
“It is really very good of you to come, Watson,” said he. “It makes a considerable difference to me, having someone with me on whom I can thoroughly rely. Local aid is always either worthless or else biased. If you will keep the two corner seats I shall get the tickets.”
We had the carriage to ourselves save for an immense litter of papers which Holmes had brought with him. Among these he rummaged and read, with intervals of note-taking and of meditation, until we were past Reading. Then he suddenly rolled them all into a gigantic ball, and tossed them up on to the rack.

[The legendary deerstalker appears! –Selena]

June 27, 1902: Killer Evans wounded Watson in the leg. [3GAR]

Illustration by Howard K. Elcock for The Strand Magazine (1925)

In an instant he had whisked out a revolver from his breast and had fired two shots. I felt a sudden hot sear as if a red-hot iron had been pressed to my thigh. There was a crash as Holmes’s pistol came down on the man’s head. I had a vision of him sprawling upon the floor with blood running down his face while Holmes rummaged him for weapons. Then my friend’s wiry arms were round me and he was leading me to a chair.
“You’re not hurt, Watson? For God’s sake, say that you are not hurt!”
It was worth a wound – it was worth many wounds – to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain.

June 27, 1902: Holmes turned Killer Evans over to Scotland Yard. [3GAR]

“But say, Mr. Holmes, what have I done wrong, anyhow? I’ve not used this plant. I’ve not hurt this old stiff. Where do you get me?”
“Only attempted murder, so far as I can see,” said Holmes. “But that’s not our job. They take that at the next stage. What we wanted at present was just your sweet self. Please give the Yard a call, Watson. It won’t be entirely unexpected.”

On June 26th…

(Source: A Day by Day Chronology of Mr. Sherlock Holmes According to Zeisler and Christ, compiled by William S Dorn)

June 26, 1889: Holmes interviewed Henry Wood about Colonel Barclay’s death. [CROO]

Illustration by Sidney Paget for The Strand Magazine (1893)

“Mr. Henry Wood, late of India, I believe?” said Holmes, affably. “I’ve come over this little matter of Colonel Barclay’s death.”
“What should I know about that?”
“That’s what I wanted to ascertain. You know, I suppose, that unless the matter is cleared up, Mrs. Barclay, who is an old friend of yours, will in all probability be tried for murder?”
The man gave a violent start.
“I don’t know who you are,” he cried, “nor how you come to know what you do know, but will you swear that this is true that you tell me?”
“Why, they are only waiting for her to come to her senses to arrest her.”

June 26, 1902: John Garrideb visited Holmes. [3GAR]

Illustration by Frederic Dorr Steele, Philadelphia Evening Bulletin (1925)

 

A moment later he was in the room. Mr. John Garrideb, Counsellor at Law, was a short, powerful man with the round, fresh, clean-shaven face characteristic of so many American men of affairs. The general effect was chubby and rather childlike, so that one received the impression of quite a young man with a broad set smile upon his face. His eyes, however, were arresting. Seldom in any human head have I seen a pair which bespoke a more intense inward life, so bright were they, so alert, so responsive to every change of thought. His accent was American, but was not accompanied by any eccentricity of speech.

 

June 26, 1902: Holmes and Watson visited Nathan Garrideb’s museum. [3GAR]

Illustration by Howard K. Elcock for The Strand Magazine (1925)

The house had a common stair, and there were a number of names painted in the hall, some indicating offices and some private chambers. It was not a collection of residential flats, but rather the abode of Bohemian bachelors. Our client opened the door for us himself and apologized by saying that the woman in charge left at four o’clock. Mr. Nathan Garrideb proved to be a very tall, loose-jointed, round-backed person, gaunt and bald, some sixty-odd years of age. He had a cadaverous face, with the dull dead skin of a man to whom exercise was unknown. Large round spectacles and a small projecting goat’s beard combined with his stooping attitude to give him an expression of peering curiosity. The general effect, however, was amiable, though eccentric.

On June 24th…

(Source: A Day by Day Chronology of Mr. Sherlock Holmes According to Zeisler and Christ, compiled by William S Dorn)

Illustration by Frank Wiles for The Strand Magazine (1915)

June 24, 1872: McMurdo was made into Lodge 29 of the Ancient Order of Freemen in Chicago. [VALL]

“This is a strange welcome,” McMurdo answered, with some dignity, “for the bodymaster of a Lodge of Freemen to give to a stranger brother.”
“Aye, but it’s just that same that you have to prove,” said McGinty, “and God help you if you fail. Where were you made?”
“Lodge 29, Chicago.”
“When?”
“June 24th, 1872.”
“What bodymaster?”
“James H.Scott.”
“Who is your district ruler?”
“Bartholomew Wilson.”

 

Denys Hawthorne as Col. James Barclay (1984)

June 24, 1889: Colonel Barclay died of apoplexy. [CROO]

“Ah, Holmes,” [the Major] said, “I suppose you have heard that all this fuss has come to nothing?”
“What, then?”
“The inquest is just over. The medical evidence showed conclusively that death was due to apoplexy. You see, it was quite a simple case after all.”
“Oh, remarkably superficial,” said Holmes, smiling. “Come, Watson, I don’t think we shall be wanted in Aldershot any more.”

June 24, 1890: The coroner’s inquest into Charles McCarthy’s death was held. [BOSC]

Will Tacey as the Coroner (1991)

“I see,” said I, as I glanced down the column, “that the coroner in his concluding remarks was rather severe upon young McCarthy. He calls attention, and with reason, to the discrepancy about his father having signalled to him before seeing him, also to his refusal to give details of his conversation with his father, and his singular account of his father’s dying words. They are all, as he remarks, very much against the son.”

June 24, 1902: John Garrideb visited Nathan Garrideb. [3GAR]

Illustration by Frederic Dorr Steele in the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin (1925)

“I merely called to make your acquaintance, and there is no reason why I should interrupt your studies,” said Holmes. “I prefer to establish personal touch with those with whom I do business. There are few questions I need ask, for I have your very clear narrative in my pocket, and I filled up the blanks when this American gentleman called. I understand that up to this week you were unaware of his existence.”
“That is so. He called last Tuesday.”
“Did he tell you of our interview today?”
“Yes, he came straight back to me. He had been very angry.”
“Why should he be angry?”
“He seemed to think it was some reflection on his honour. But he was quite cheerful again when he returned.”

On June 27th…

June 27, 1890: Holmes and Watson traveled by train to Boscombe Valley (BOSC)
June 27, 1902: Killer Evans wounded Watson in the leg (3GAR)
June 27, 1902: Holmes turned Killer Evans over to Scotland Yard (3GAR)

On June 26th…

June 26, 1889: Holmes interviewed Henry Wood about Colonel Barclay’s death (CROO)
June 26, 1902: John Garrideb visited Holmes (3GAR)
June 26, 1902: Holmes and Watson visited Nathan Garrideb’s museum (3GAR)

On June 24th…

June 24, 1872: McMurdo was made into Lodge 29 of the Eminent Order of Freemen in Chicago (VALL)
June 24, 1889: Colonel Barclay died of apoplexy (CROO)
June 24, 1890: The coroner’s inquest into Charles McCarthy’s death was held (BOSC)
June 24, 1902: John Garrideb visited Nathan Garrideb (3GAR)

On June 27th…

June 27, 1890: Holmes and Watson traveled by train to Boscombe Valley. (BOSC)
Editor’s Note: This story contains that great Drawing by Sidney Paget. The one with Holmes laid out on the grass using his magnifying Glass to the minute clue to solve the case with. That drawing along with others drew a world of word pictures in which a skinny boy with glasses found a world that was all his own.

June 27, 1902: “Killer” Evans wounded Watson in the leg. (3GAR)

Holmes turns James Winter, alias Morecroft, alias “Killer” Evans over to Scotland Yard. Holmes had threatened “Killer” Evans with those immortal words that showed Dr Watson just how much he meant to Holmes.

“In an instant he had whisked out a revolver from his breast and had fired two shots. I felt a sudden hot sear as if a red-hot iron had been pressed to my thigh. There was a crash as Holmes’s pistol came down on the man’s head. I had a vision of him sprawling upon the floor with blood running down his face while Holmes rummaged him for weapons. Then my friend’s wiry arms were round me and he was leading me to a chair.

“You’re not hurt, Watson? For God’s sake, say that you are not hurt!”

It was worth a wound – it was worth many wounds – to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.

“It’s nothing, Holmes. It’s a mere scratch.”

He had ripped up my trousers with his pocket-knife.

“You are right,” he cried, with an immense sigh of relief. “It is quite superficial.” His face set like flint as he glared at our prisoner, who was sitting up with a dazed face. “By the Lord, it is as well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have got out of this room alive. Now, sir, what have you to say for yourself?”

From The Adventure of The Three Garridebs, one of the stories in The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes.

Words that were exquisite in their effect on me when I first read them back on the plains of Kansas at the ripe old age of 12.

On June 26th…

June 26, 1889: Holmes interviewed Henry Wood about Colonel Barclay’s death. (CROO)
Editor’s Note: Here we meet Toby the mongoose. One of the most unusual animal characters that we see in the Canon.

June 26, 1902: “John Garrideb” visits Holmes. (3GAR)
June 26, 1902: Holmes and Watson visit Nathan Garrideb’s museum. (3GAR)

On June 24th…

June 24, 1890: The coroner’s inquest into Charles McCarthy’s death was held. (BOSC)
June 24, 1902: “John Garrideb” visits Nathan Garrideb. (3GAR)
June 24, 1889: Colonel Barclay died of Apoplexy. (CROO)